Let Them Eat (genetically engineered) Cake

About the food industry, not in a nice way

random, or purposeful?

Posted by jeanne on June 5, 2010

i’m mildly autistic, as an artist.  it’s a good trait because i don’t respond in a ‘normal’ cultural way, because the ‘normal’ way just doesn’t make sense to me.  so my art isn’t normal either.  which is why i don’t sell, but never mind that.  autistic people (and i suspect there are many more out there than anyone thinks, it being a spectrum) don’t tend to see the hand of fate, karma, or god behind things that happen.  they are okay with a universe that happens randomly.

if you read the article, you’ll see at the end where they’re investigating schizophrenia for a similar reaction.  but with schizophrenics, they’re looking for the opposite – people who see another’s hand in absolutely everything.

while i’m slightly autistic, i must be much more paranoid and schizophrenic, because i never see random.  it’s always highly organized, very meaningful, and intensely metaphorical.

May 29, 2010 05:30 PM

People with Asperger’s less likely to see purpose behind the events in their lives

By Karen Schrock

BOSTON—Why do we often attribute events in our lives to a higher power or supernatural force? Some psychologists believe this kind of thinking, called teleological thinking, is a by-product of social cognition. As our ancestors evolved, we developed the ability to understand one anothers’ ideas and intentions. As a result of this “theory of mind,” some experts figure, we also tend to see intention or purpose—a conscious mind—behind random or naturally occurring events. A new study presented here in a poster at the 22nd annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science supports this idea, showing that people who may have an impaired theory of mind are less likely to think in a teleological way.

Bethany T. Heywood, a graduate student at Queens University Belfast, asked 27 people with Asperger’s syndrome, a mild type of autism that involves impaired social cognition, about significant events in their lives. Working with experimental psychologist Jesse M. Bering (author of the “Bering in Mind” blog and a frequent contributor to Scientific American MIND), she asked them to speculate about why these important events happened—for instance, why they had gone through an illness or why they met a significant other. As compared with 34 neurotypical people, those with Asperger’s syndrome were significantly less likely to invoke a teleological response—for example, saying the event was meant to unfold in a particular way or explaining that God had a hand in it. They were more likely to invoke a natural cause (such as blaming an illness on a virus they thought they were exposed to) or to give a descriptive response, explaining the event again in a different way.

In a second experiment, Heywood and Bering compared 27 people with Asperger’s with 34 neurotypical people who are atheists. The atheists, as expected, often invoked anti-teleological responses such as “there is no reason why; things just happen.” The people with Asperger’s were significantly less likely to offer such anti-teleological explanations than the atheists, indicating they were not engaged in teleological thinking at all. (The atheists, in contrast, revealed themselves to be reasoning teleologically, but then they rejected those thoughts.)

These results support the idea that seeing purpose behind life events is a result of our mind’s focus on social thinking. People whose social cognition is impaired—those with Asperger’s, in this case—are less likely to see the events in their lives as having happened for a reason. Heywood would like to test the hypothesis further by working with people who have schizophrenia or schizoid personalities. Some experts theorize that certain schizophrenia symptoms (for instance, paranoia) arise in part from a hyperactive sense of social reasoning. “I’d guess that they’d give lots of teleological answers; more than neurotypical people, and certainly far more than people with Asperger’s,” Heywood says.

One Response to “random, or purposeful?”

  1. […] random, or purposeful? (geneticake.wordpress.com) LikeBe the first to like this post. […]

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